Delilah Wancio
timidflower:

timidflower:

This is my new painting. It was inspired by Nicole Dollanganger’s beautiful song, Nara Dreamland.

8”x10” prints of my painting are up for sale here! Your support means the absolute world to me. Thank you so much.

timidflower:

timidflower:

This is my new painting. It was inspired by Nicole Dollanganger’s beautiful song, Nara Dreamland.

8”x10” prints of my painting are up for sale here! Your support means the absolute world to me. Thank you so much.

theraccolta:

Stella Maris, ora pro nobis!

theraccolta:

Stella Maris, ora pro nobis!

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Laura Span
Pills
sailorslutt:

I found a baby bat and tried to take care of it, it survived three days in a bat house I made and my googling every need of baby bats. They need to be raised by a mother bat because they need that milk. He died and I gave him a funeral. I thought it was only acceptable to kill pretty flowers go rest with him and be with him wherever we go next. All living thing deserves a send off.

sailorslutt:

I found a baby bat and tried to take care of it, it survived three days in a bat house I made and my googling every need of baby bats. They need to be raised by a mother bat because they need that milk. He died and I gave him a funeral. I thought it was only acceptable to kill pretty flowers go rest with him and be with him wherever we go next. All living thing deserves a send off.

victoriousvocabulary:

MONO NO AWARE
[noun]
(物の哀れ), literally “the pathos of things”, also translated as “an empathy toward things”, or “a sensitivity to ephemera” - a Japanese term for the awareness of impermanence, or transience of things, and both a transient gentle sadness (or wistfulness) at their passing as well as a longer, deeper gentle sadness about this state being the reality of life.
Etymology: coined in the 18th century by the Edo period Japanese cultural scholar Motoori Norinaga. The phrase is derived from the Japanese word mono, which means “thing”, and aware, which was a Heian period expression of measured surprise (similar to “ah” or “oh”), translating roughly as “pathos”, “poignancy”, “deep feeling”, “sensitivity”, or “awareness”. Thus, mono no aware has frequently been translated as “the ‘ahh-ness’ of things”, life, and love. Content source.
[Martin Wittfooth]

victoriousvocabulary:

MONO NO AWARE

[noun]

(物の哀れ), literally “the pathos of things”, also translated as “an empathy toward things”, or “a sensitivity to ephemera” - a Japanese term for the awareness of impermanence, or transience of things, and both a transient gentle sadness (or wistfulness) at their passing as well as a longer, deeper gentle sadness about this state being the reality of life.

Etymology: coined in the 18th century by the Edo period Japanese cultural scholar Motoori Norinaga. The phrase is derived from the Japanese word mono, which means “thing”, and aware, which was a Heian period expression of measured surprise (similar to “ah” or “oh”), translating roughly as “pathos”, “poignancy”, “deep feeling”, “sensitivity”, or “awareness”. Thus, mono no aware has frequently been translated as “the ‘ahh-ness’ of things”, life, and love. Content source.

[Martin Wittfooth]